Skip to main content

Museum Standards Program

Workbook two links and resources

The following resources may be useful in operating a museum, gallery or collection.

If you discover a broken link, please let us know at info@arts.tas.gov.au

Section One: Managing the museum

STANDARD A2.2 The museum works to formal, written policies and procedures that cover its management, responsibilities, programs and services, and reflect its Statement of Purpose.

Link

What is it?

Dickman and Winkworth, Significant Events, Museums & Galleries Queensland 2000

‘The kit was developed during 2000 and 2001 to enable museums and galleries to fully develop and effectively market exhibitions and projects highlighting the Centenary of Federation in 2001. The first section of the kit deals specifically with this theme and although the Centenary of Federation is now over, it provides a useful model for those wishing to link future exhibitions and events to key dates.’

Museums Australia Victoria, Interpretation Policy templateThis template walks your museum through the steps of creating or updating an Interpretation Policy which will guide your museum’s exhibitions and programs into the future.
South Australian Community History, Interpretation Policy/Plan: guidelines to writingThis guide offers more information on interpretation planning.

STANDARD A4.3 The museum conserves, maintains, protects and documents its assets.

Link

What is it?

Heritage NSW, Preparing a maintenance plan

This document walks your museum through preparing a maintenance plan, from listing assets through to a schedule of work and budgeting.

State Heritage Office WA, An information guide to conservation management strategy

‘A CMS is an owner’s practical guide to the maintenance of a heritage place. Amongst other things, it contains a Building Condition Assessment Report, conservation management schedule and maintenance schedule.’

Our Community, Assets Register

‘An asset register allows you to keep track of your assets and provides a fair estimate of their worth. It meets your taxation, statutory and sale-of-business obligations. It is also an appropriate place to record serial numbers, make, model, etc.’

ICOMOS, Heritage Tool Kit

‘A web-based toolkit of reference resources for heritage conservation’

ICOMOS, The Conservation Plan

This kit ‘outlines the logical processes of the Burra Charter, and how to prepare a Conservation Plan to guide and manage change to a heritage item appropriately.’

STANDARD A1.6 The museum complies with Australian federal, state/territory and local laws, by-laws and regulations.

Link

What is it?

Department of Justice, Working with Children Registration

Why do I need to be registered?

The aim is to keep our children as safe as possible by reducing the incidence of sexual, physical, psychological, emotional harm or neglect of children in Tasmania. Tasmania will come into line with all other Australian States and Territories who already have similar registration processes.’

Tasmania Police, Firearms

‘This is a guide to the requirements of firearm owners as provided by the Firearms Act 1996 in relation to: Buying and Selling of Firearms and Ammunition, Firearms Licences and Permits, Firearms Storage, Transporting of Firearms, Firearms Amnesty.’

Department of Treasury and Finance, Applying for a liquor license

This web page guides organisation and businesses through applying for a license to sell alcohol, and what kind of license might be suitable.

Hobart City Council, Food

Like many councils, Hobart City Council offers information and business templates for organisations and businesses considering selling food. They also offer access to a free online food safety education program.

Parks and Wildlife Service Tasmania, Shipwrecks in Tasmania

This web page outlines the historical context of Tasmania’s shipwreck heritage, how it can best be enjoyed and our legal obligations to care for it.

Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania

Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania should be the first point of contact for advice upon receiving or discovering any Aboriginal artefacts such as stone tools.

Tasmanian Legislation, Aboriginal Relics Act 1975

Our present legal obligations as individuals and organisations are outlined in the Act above. It is currently in the process of being revised.

National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries

For more information on your museum’s potential legal obligations, please consult the National Standards for Australian Museums and Galleries ‘Tips’ for this standard.

Section Two: Involving people

STANDARD B1.1 The museum includes a range of people in its operations and programs.

Link

What is it?

Museums & Galleries of NSW, Attracting new museum audiences

‘The following resource is drawn from the workshop titled Community, Collaboration, Change presented by Rebecca Jones as part of the 2015 Standards Program. The workshop focused on attracting new visitors and recruiting museum volunteers. While this resource addresses audience development, it is important to note that the same processes can be used to attract new volunteers.’

Accessible Arts, Resources

The mission of Accessible Arts is ‘To provide leadership in arts + disability through information, advocacy and the facilitation of excellence in arts practice.’  Information and resources include universal access symbols, and an Accessibility Starter Check List

Arts Tasmania, Respecting Cultures: working with the Tasmanian Aboriginal community and Aboriginal artists

‘Respecting Cultures is also an important tool in managing the ethical use of Tasmanian Aboriginal culture and arts. It is designed not only to protect Aboriginal cultural expressions created by Tasmanian Aborigines, but also to assist people who support and practise integrity in arts and culture, including heritage and history. It can be used to foster relationships in sharing Tasmanian Aboriginal cultural expressions within a set of expectations and/or obligations, and to enhance these relationships within the arts industry.’

Arts Tasmania, Disability Action Plan Guide

‘Arts Tasmania has created a guide to developing disability action plans that can assist arts organisations, artists and venues to be more accessible to people with disability.’

Landman et al., Many Voices Making Choices: museum audiences with disabilities Australian Museum, (2005)

‘One in five Australians has some type of disability. People with disabilities represent a large, diverse and important audience for museums and galleries. The aim of this study to give voice to the views of visitors with disabilities and suggest ways in which museums and galleries can better support their access needs.’

Museums Australia, Continuous Cultures, Ongoing Responsibilities: principles and guidelines for Australian museums working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage.

Museums Australia is the peak body for museums in Australia. Continuous Cultures, Ongoing Responsibilities outlines the ethical obligations and protocols for museums working with Indigenous communities and their collections.

Museums & Galleries Queensland, Taking the Time: museums and galleries, cultural protocols and communities

 

Museums & Galleries NSW, Introduction to Access

 

Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery, Kids in Museums Manifesto

 

Museums Australia Tasmania, Make Museums Your Own

 

History South Australia, Indigenous acknowledgement

 

Dickman and Winkworth, Significant Events, Museums & Galleries Queensland 2000

‘The kit was developed during 2000 and 2001 to enable museums and galleries to fully develop and effectively market exhibitions and projects highlighting the Centenary of Federation in 2001. The first section of the kit deals specifically with this theme and although the Centenary of Federation is now over, it provides a useful model for those wishing to link future exhibitions and events to key dates.’

Our Museum, Engaging Communities

One of a series of short films made in the UK as part of the ‘Our Museum: museums and communities as active partners’ program from the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

STANDARD B2.3 The museum’s exhibitions, activities and events actively encourage lifelong learning.

Link

What is it?

Museums Australia Victoria, Exhibitions: a practical guide for small museums and galleries

Exhibitions: a practical guide for small museums and galleries is the first step-by-step guide book on how to initiate, manage and deliver an exhibition. The book will assist small museums and galleries in developing exhibitions. The comprehensive list of templates accompanying this publication are now available online.’

South Australian Community History, Display interpretation and writing

‘Just displaying an object does not reveal its significance or meaning. While museum workers might know what an item is and understand why it is important, this is not apparent to museum visitors without interpretation and explanation. Interpreting objects in the context of a museum involves revealing and sharing their significance in a planned, sensitive and creative manner.’

Museums Australia Victoria, Interpretation Policy template

This template walks your museum through the steps of creating or updating an Interpretation Policy which will guide your museum’s exhibitions and programs into the future.

South Australian Community History, Interpretation Policy/Plan: guidelines to writing

This guide offers more information on interpretation planning.

Dickman and Winkworth, Significant Events, Museums & Galleries Queensland 2000

‘The kit was developed during 2000 and 2001 to enable museums and galleries to fully develop and effectively market exhibitions and projects highlighting the Centenary of Federation in 2001. The first section of the kit deals specifically with this theme and although the Centenary of Federation is now over, it provides a useful model for those wishing to link future exhibitions and events to key dates.’

Heritage Lilydale, Example Exhibition Plan

 

Heritage Highway Museum & Visitor Information Centre, Example Exhibition Plan

 

The Geffrye Museum, Learning and Engagement Policy and Forward Plan

The Geffrye Museum is a house museum in London that explores life at the house from the 1600s to the present day. Their education page shows an ambitious range of programs from early learning to English as a Second Language. A link to their learning and engagement policy and forward plan can be found at the bottom of the page.

Museums & Galleries of NSW, Education

This web page provides a list of resources regarding children’s education, including ideas on object based learning and risk management for excursions.

Museums and Galleries Queensland, What do teachers want from museum spaces?

‘Museums Australia Education Queensland Network hosted a panel discussion titled, ‘What do teachers want from museum spaces’, on Wednesday 22 July 2015.

This discussion explored what teachers want from museums. The aim of this evening was to provide insights into how museums can meet the needs of 21st century students. The format was a series of questions to the panel and audience.

Some of the topics covered included:

  • The perfect museums excursion
  • The value museums provide to teachers and students
  • What students enjoy about museum spaces
  • The barriers schools face with excursions
  • Providing deeper experiences.’

South Australian Community History, Australian Curriculum History: making links with local schools

‘Is your community museum looking to attract school groups?  The new guideline document The Australian Curriculum: History, How to make links with your local school: a guide for community museums includes some background information about the new Australian Curriculum: History and a handy template for making it clear to teachers what your museum has to offer against different aspects of the curriculum.’

South Australian Community History, Historical Research: an investigative treasure hunt

‘Whether you are gathering background information about objects in your collection or working towards a display, guided tour or educational program, sound research is essential. Developing good research skills and practices will ensure you find the most accurate and most interesting information, and take advantage of the widest possible range of sources. It will make research more enjoyable and rewarding and will result in a better end product.’

National Museum Australia, Museums, education and visitor experience

‘Education in most museums has come to mean lifelong learning, expanding well beyond merely providing visits by children in school groups. Positive interventions in childhood have extremely important impacts on later life. Several museums in Australia, including the Australian Museum, the Melbourne Museum and the National Museum of Australia, have paid special attention to younger children. The essays in this section examine education within museums, including art education, schools programs, children's programs and family visits, as well as looking at museum studies – the education and professional training of museum professionals.’

Australian Museum, Knowledge Quest: Australian Families Visit Museums

‘Across the world, museums have paid considerable attention to the needs of children and families through the development of targeted exhibitions, activities and programs and as special-purpose areas. This study was undertaken to bring together current information about family visit experiences, and is the second of the audience research series produced by the Australian Museum, Sydney and the National Museum of Australia, Canberra.’

STANDARD B3.2 The museum promotes its collection, key attractions, programs and services.

Link

What is it?

Museums & Galleries of NSW, Marketing for Museums

‘This Fact Sheet explains some of the fundamentals of marketing and the importance of understanding your audience. An excellent resource for museums with small or no budgets.’

Dickman and Winkworth, Significant Events, Museums & Galleries Queensland (2001), part 3, pp. 24–33

‘The kit was developed during 2000 and 2001 to enable museums and galleries to fully develop and effectively market exhibitions and projects highlighting the Centenary of Federation in 2001. The first section of the kit deals specifically with this theme and although the Centenary of Federation is now over, it provides a useful model for those wishing to link future exhibitions and events to key dates.’

DCITA, Tourism with Integrity(1999), pp. 50–5

‘The resource itself explores how cultural and heritage organisations wanting to observe cultural and heritage principles can build visitor numbers and work with the tourism industry. Tourism with integrity is an invaluable tool for organisations to assess their own performance and set priorities for improvement. The process works equally well for organisations run by volunteers, paid staff or a combination of both.’

Canadian Heritage Information Network, Resources for Social Media in Museums

The Canadian Heritage Information Network supports Canadian museums through professional development opportunities, information resources and support. This page provides an introduction to why and how your museum could best use social media to your advantage.

MA (Vic) Online Tools for Museums

Museums Australia (Victoria) offer this information sheet on online tools and social media websites that can help community museums to share their collections cost effectively.

Museums Association, Museum Practice: Social Media

The Museums Association is a membership based organisation for all museum staff and volunteers in the UK – the equivalent of Museums Australia. Museum Practice offers professional development resources and inspiration. This section discusses the basics of social media.

Community Museums Prince Edward Island, Marketing

Community Museums Prince Edward Island offers support services and professional development opportunities for the island’s museums.

‘Marketing and strategic marketing plans can serve to achieve a museum’s mission or mandate which is to collection, research, educated and to interpret historical information.’

Western Australian Museum, Marketing Museums

‘Marketing helps museums meet their goals and objectives. It helps attract visitors, and by identifying and meeting their needs, ensures they have a satisfying experience.’

Business Victoria, Write a Marketing Plan

‘A good marketing plan will help you answer key questions about your business, and act as a reference document to help you to execute your marketing strategy. It will also help you to develop a structured approach to creating services and products that satisfy your customers’ needs….Use our marketing plan template to set realistic and measurable objectives, includes budgets and action plans, and allocate responsibilities.’

Section Three: Developing a significant collection

STANDARD B2.1 The museum selects significant collection areas, stories or themes to highlight, based on what is most relevant to its purpose and audiences.

Link

What is it?

South Australian Community History, Australian Curriculum History: making links with local schools

‘Is your community museum looking to attract school groups?  The new guideline document The Australian Curriculum: History, How to make links with your local school: a guide for community museums includes some background information about the new Australian Curriculum: History and a handy template for making it clear to teachers what your museum has to offer against different aspects of the curriculum.’

Museums and Galleries of NSW, Education

‘Here is a list of resources about the Working with Children Check, organising school excursions and the basics of risk management.’

South Australian Community History, Historical Research: an investigative treasure hunt

‘Whether you are gathering background information about objects in your collection or working towards a display, guided tour or educational program, sound research is essential. Developing good research skills and practices will ensure you find the most accurate and most interesting information, and take advantage of the widest possible range of sources. It will make research more enjoyable and rewarding and will result in a better end product.’

National Museum Australia, Museums, education and visitor experience

Education in most museums has come to mean lifelong learning, expanding well beyond merely providing visits by children in school groups. Positive interventions in childhood have extremely important impacts on later life. Several museums in Australia, including the Australian Museum, the Melbourne Museum and the National Museum of Australia, have paid special attention to younger children. The essays in this section examine education within museums, including art education, schools programs, children's programs and family visits, as well as looking at museum studies – the education and professional training of museum professionals.

Australian Museum, Knowledge Quest: Australian Families Visit Museums

Across the world, museums have paid considerable attention to the needs of children and families through the development of targeted exhibitions, activities and programs and as special-purpose areas. This study was undertaken to bring together current information about family visit experiences, and is the second of the audience research series produced by the Australian Museum, Sydney and the National Museum of Australia, Canberra.’

STANDARD B2.2 The museum’s exhibitions, activities and events are based on sound research and current museological practices.

Link

What is it?

University of Tasmania, Bibliography

This UTAS Library study guide helps format a bibliography of sources.

Museums and Galleries of NSW, Copyright: the basics

This document provides an easy to understand introduction to copyright law in Australia.

Standard C1.2 The museum knows the significance of its collection.

Link

What is it?

Museums & Galleries of NSW, Deaccessioning & Disposal

‘Deaccessioning is the formal process of removal of an object from the collection register, catalogue or database.

Disposal is the physical removal of the object from the organisation by the process decided upon by the collections or acquisition committee.

Deaccessioning is part of collection management. Just as an organisation should have an accession or acquisition policy they should also have a deaccession policy which addresses why and how deaccessioned material will be disposed of.’

Museums & Galleries of NSW,Reviewing collections

‘The aim of this guide is to support museums in considering and selecting appropriate methodologies to guide the rationalisation of their collections. It identifies the main issues for museums to consider and provides information about tools and resources available to support the rationalisation procedure.’

Australian Government, Department of Communication and the Arts, Significance 2.0

Written by Kylie Winkworth, Significance 2.0 is one of the most influential publications on museum practice, describing objective criteria for describing the significance of an object or a collection, and how to use the rich information gained through researching and documenting your collection.